Site updated at Thursday, 03 January 2019

Health - Severe Hypertension

Expectant mothers on antidepressants risk newborns with high blood pressure

Friday, Jan 13 2012

  

Mothers who take anti-depressants during pregnancy are more likely to give birth to children with persistent pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs) finds a study published today on bmj.com.

Persistent pulmonary hypertension is an increase in blood pressure in the lungs leading to shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. It is a rare, but severe disease with strong links to heart failure.

The study, carried out by researchers at the Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm Sweden, reviewed 1.6 million births in total between 1996 and 2007 in five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The babies were assessed after 231 days (33 weeks).

A total of 1,618,255 singleton births were included in the study. Approximately 11,000 of the mothers filled out a prescription for anti-depressants in late pregnancy and approximately 17,000 in early pregnancy. Those who did fill out a prescription were generally older mothers who also smoked. A further 54,184 mothers were identified as having previously undergone psychiatric diagnosis but were not currently taking any medication.

Factors taken into account during the study included persistent pulmonary hypertension, maternal smoking, BMI (in early pregnancy), year of birth, gestational age at birth, birth weight and maternal diseases including epilepsy, malignancies, arthritis, bowel disease, lupus and pre-eclampsia.

The uses of several drugs were analysed which included fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, citalopram, paroxetine, sertraline, fluvoxamine and escitalopram. Although, research found that fluvoxamine had rarely been used and that none of the children with persistent pulmonary hypertension were exposed to this drug.

The results found that out of 11,014 mothers who used anti-depressants in late pregnancy just 33 babies (0.2%) were born with persistent pulmonary hypertension and out of 17,053 mothers who used anti-depressant drugs in early pregnancy, just 32 babies (less than 0.2%) were diagnosed with persistent pulmonary hypertension. A total of 114 babies whose mothers had previously been diagnosed with a mental illness were found to be suffering from the disease.

For mothers using anti-depressants, factors such as being born small for gestational age, or by C-section did not influence the likelihood of having a child with persistent pulmonary hypertension.

While the authors acknowledge that the risk of developing pulmonary persistent hypertension is low (around three cases per 1000 women which more than doubles if anti-depressants are taken in late pregnancy) they still advise caution when treating pregnant women with SSRIs.

“The Patch is birth control that works with my busy life.”

What is ORTHO EVRA®

ORTHO EVRA® is a contraceptive patch used for the prevention of pregnancy.
-  ORTHO EVRA® is available by prescription only.
-  ORTHO EVRA® does not protect against HIV (AIDS) or other sexually transmitted diseases.
-  ORTHO EVRA® should not be used if you smoke cigarettes and are over 35 years old.

The ORTHO EVRA patch is used as follows: it is applied on the first day of your menstrual cycle or the first Sunday following that day, whichever is preferred. From this time on, that day is considered “patch change day.” When patch change day rolls around the following week, the first patch is removed and replaced with another. This happens once more. On the fourth patch change day the patch is removed and left off for one week, until the next patch change day when the cycle begins again.

In an accompanying editorial, researchers from the Motherisk Program Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and the School of Pharmacy at the University of Oslo support the view that mothers who take SSRIs in late pregnancy are more likely to give birth to children with persistent pulmonary hypertension.

###

Research: Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors during pregnancy and risks of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn: population based cohort study from the five Nordic countries.

Editorial: SSRIs and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn

###

Stephanie Burns
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
44-207-383-6920
BMJ-British Medical Journal


Provided by Armina Hypertension Association

Post a comment [ + Comment here + ]

There are no comments for this entry yet. [ + Comment here + ]




Comment
Your details

* Required field


Please enter the word you see in the image below:

Comments are moderated by our editors, so there may be a delay between submission and publication of your comment. Offensive or abusive comments will not be published.